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PeaceRep report on Fragmentation of Peacemaking in Libya

Peace and Conflict Resolution Evident Platform (PeaceRep) recently released a report entitled ‘Fragmentation of Peacemaking in Libya: Reality and Perception’ authored by Jalel Harchaoui, Associate Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), and Bernardo Mariani, Peace and Conflict Resolution Consultant at PeaceRep.

The report focuses on the engagements of countries that have had sizeable roles and postures in the Libyan crisis from 2011 onwards – Russia, Turkey, and the UAE, but also regarding the lesser-involved China. It is based on original interviews with Libyan and foreign stakeholders centred around how local actors interpret the impact of non-Western actors in Libya, although the authors note these interviews displayed varying levels of political bias. The report also draws upon political analysis and media reports to reach its conclusions and findings.

Through their research, Harchaoui and Mariani uncovered key findings that interference and competing interests of foreign powers remain active in Libya and have exacerbated tensions and conflicts, noting the division between Western powers since NATO’s 2011 intervention for having led to further non-Western engagement in Libya. They allocate the role of primary ‘meddlers’ to Russia, Turkey, and UAE in that order, finding China has focused on economic penetration and low-key diplomacy as a risk-averse method of involvement. Harchaoui and Mariani note these state interventions in Libya have shifted over time, with Russia’s war in Ukraine creating a noticeable effect by increasing the probability of actions by Western countries and Turkey to weaken Russia’s presence in Libya. The report concludes by emphasising the need for international efforts to maintain the relative calm seen in Libya’s political landscape.

Read the full report here.

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